NoMad New York

Located on the corner of 28th and Broadway, just north of Madison Square Park, The NoMad Hotel is an old Beaux-Arts building that has been revived to its original grandeur by French architect and interior designer, Jacques Garcia, best known for his contemporary interiors of Paris hotels and restaurants.

The design of the hotel was inspired by the classic, timeless style of the Parisian flat of Garcia's youth and blends classic grand hotels of Europe with a distinct New York sensibility. Each wall is adorned with hand-selected, richly textured custom-designed furnishings and original artwork. The lofty ceilings throughout the hotel provide luxurious spaces to enjoy dining, socialising, and rest. 

The hotel's elegant food and beverage menu was created by Chef Daniel Humm and Restaurateur Will Guidara. Inspired by Chef Humm's time spent throughout Switzerland, California, and New York City, the restaurant is rooted in the same traditions found at the critically acclaimed, Michelin three-star rated Eleven Madison Park. The menu is sophisticated, yet approachable, complemented by a wine program that celebrates the great wine-growing regions of the world and innovative, classically-focused cocktails.

The hotel's most coveted features are its signature claw-foot bathtubs, ARGAN soaps by La Bottega, city views, and a restaurant built in a sunlit glass-enclosed atrium. Other amenities include a nightly turndown service, a 24-hour gym and a bi-level library, plus an indoor/outdoor rooftop event space, and a stylish lounge with a 24-foot mahogany bar.

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thenomadhotel.com

NoMad Bed
NoMad Bath
Gucci Shoes
NoMad Books
NoMad Desk
NoMad Vines
NoMad Library
NoMad Dining

URBAN TALES


I had the pleasure of being interviewed by Jo-anne Quinlan of URBAN TALES—a platform where urban creatives from across the globe and all walks of life, share stories or glimpses into the philosophy behind their work. The website beautifully depicts that the city is a melting pot of cultures and ideas, a living artwork that breathes an air of new possibilities. In our conversation below, I delved a little deeper into the connections between my passions in medicine, photography, and writing—which intertwine harmoniously in my work. 


INTERVIEW

Jo-anne: You travel a great deal. Where do you live now?

Koi: I currently reside in New York, but the future is mysterious. Perhaps, I will call my next home: Mars. 

Jo-anne: You are a very talented photographer, but also art director, writer, and scientist. Can you tell us a little bit more about the relationship between these different fields?

Koi: Thank you—I am humbled and very much appreciate the kind words! There are infinite enigmas in science that are waiting to be deciphered, so I just think of myself as a little student in this massive universe, perpetually wide-eyed and curious, as there is always something new to learn or a skill to cultivate. 

On first impression, art, writing, photography, medicine, and science may appear to be completely unrelated fields that do not intermingle. However, these realms can be colourful threads that weave together to form a vivid web.

At the lab, I work with imaging technology to photograph immunohistochemistry slides containing various tissues that I prepared, stained, and mounted. Under the microscope, cells can be seen fluorescing in beautiful hues of red, brown, green, and blue, depending on the specific reagent exposures and chemical reactions at the genetic or molecular level. These experiments are executed in order to investigate behaviours, relationships, and peculiarities between different types of cells. Currently, I study cancer with the aim to establish cancer genetic profiles, discover tumour markers for early detection analysis, and develop chemo-preventive or therapeutic treatments that target tumour-specific pathways, with the main goal: to ameliorate cancer. 

Experimental design shares characteristics of art directing as well—one must direct a team of scientists to conduct experiments or studies aimed at a proposed idea or objective. Science presentations, conference posters, and publications require art design and proficient writing in order to illustrate discoveries, showcase data, and convey hypotheses to the community.

Medicine is one of the most dynamic and complex fields. It begins with: a thirst to devise how and why, honest concern, and genuine compassion. The best physician interlaces scientific theory, empirical evidence, and the art of humanity. Every human is unique and requires individualised attention—not every condition must be treated in the same manner. Thus, eclectic creativity and artful critical thinking are essential in order to provide the best care for each person. Medicine is an art. 

Jo-anne: What does art mean to you?

Koi: Art is the language of the universe. It is a dynamic entity that manifests in copious forms. 

Jo-anne: When did you first get in touch with photography?

Koi: My passion in photography was born when I was four years old and I was playing with my parents’ old Ricoh and Konica cameras. I became mesmerised by the mechanisation of the camera and curiously dissected it, unmasking its anatomy. I discovered how light travelled through lenses, reflected off mirrors, and exposed part of the light-sensitive emulsion. Thus, I learned the elements of photography like aperture, shutter speed, and ASA (ISO) through the most classic way—film.

Jo-anne: There seems to be an underlying simplicity and calmness in your photographic work. Where does this very particular vision stem from?

Koi: New York City is frequently characterised as the ‘city that never sleeps’ and sometimes labelled as a centre of chaos. However, take a deep breath, ground yourself, and feel the rhythm of the city. The way the vines overturn a deserted brick building in Brooklyn; the way the fog lingers, gracing rooftops with a beguiling stillness; the way relentless sunlight slices through the scaffolding, casting obsidian shadows with cryptic riddles; and the way the car horns beep or footsteps pitter-patter on the cobblestone streets—there is beauty in the seemingly mundane.

Jo-anne: Food and medicine are recurring themes in your photographs. Can you tell us more about this aspect of your work?

Koi: I was four years old when I started baking and cooking on my own, as my parents were never present at home, and food became one of my first subjects in photography. I fancied experimenting in the kitchen while documenting each concoction throughout the years. As an aspiring surgeon/physician, I believe that what we ingest is a vital component of our health outcome, so I often make time to hand-make my meals and other fare from scratch.

Jo-anne: What role do interior design and fashion play in your work and life?

Koi: The interior design of my studio is extremely minimal and monochromatic, punctuated with white brick and dark wood accents. The open space keeps my mind clear and focused. Regarding fashion, a large portion of my wardrobe is vintage military-inspired or NASA themed. My daily uniform typically consists of a button-down shirt with a bowtie and double-breasted coat or flight bomber with vintage patches, topped off with a wide-brimmed hat or an old-fashioned newsboy cap. 

Jo-anne: What photographic equipment do you usually travel with?

Koi: I generally travel extremely light, so my companion is usually just my DSLR with a couple of lenses—nothing too fancy. On slower adventures, I will also bring along my old film cameras and several rolls of film. The chief aspect of photography is one's unique composition and story, not one's apparatus. 

Jo-anne: What is one striking memory from one of your photography trips?

Koi: I have an intense affinity for astronomy and geospace science—my secret love-affair, so photographing the Aurora Borealis (Northern Lights) in Iceland for the first time is a breath-taking memory.

Jo-anne: What is New York like to work and live in as an urban creative?

Koi: New York is bursting with inspiration. Perhaps I am a bit odd, but I see life and soul in every nook and cranny. From the grit in the Metro to the weathering alleyways, I am endlessly inspired by the diverse history and I strive to unearth the hidden magic within the streets.


FINAL FIVE

Jo-anne: Best purchase ever? 

Koi: Jazz. I found her as a kitten abandoned in a box on the sidewalk and I instantly felt a special connection. I took her home with me and since then, we have become inseparable. When she stretches, her black and white hair pattern resembles piano keys, which is why I named her Jazz. Although she was technically not a 'purchase,' she is one of the best things to ever happen to me.

Jo-anne: Favourite book?

Koi: Since I am a bit of a bookworm, it is too difficult to select just one. The genres that I tend to gravitate towards are mysteries, science-fiction and non-fiction, or anything related to outer space. I am also enraptured by works that embody the tenuous nature of existence.

  • 1Q84 - Haruki Murakami
  • The Stranger - Albert Camus
  • Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance - Dr. Atul Gawande
  • An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth - Col. Chris Hadfield

Jo-anne: Favourite dish?

Koi: Squid ink fettuccine with handmade pesto or tagliatelle dressed in fresh tomato sauce, olive oil, and chopped basil.

Jo-anne: Next trip?

Koi: Where I will travel next is not set in stone—I will allow the natural flow of life lead me.

Jo-anne: Insiders tip to New York?

Koi: Skip the super touristy attractions. Take a walk and seek out hidden gems—that is when you will truly experience New York.

UT Desk
UT Plane
UT NY
UT Bed

DIOR LOVE CHAIN

I would conquer mountains, sail the seven seas, traverse desert lands, and skyrocket across the galaxy. And you, what would you do for love?

This short film was created for Dior Parfums, for the #DiorLoveChain campaign, to raise awareness and support for WE Charity, an international movement that partners with communities to help lift themselves out of poverty. The operation will particularly support the work of WE Schools in Kenya, aimed at providing young women with an education.

Directed + filmed by Urban Koi

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Partnership with Dior


B&O Harmonies

Bang & Olufsen introduced Harmonies, a new limited edition wireless speaker collection inspired by nature. The entire sound system was carefully designed to bring a bit of tranquility and balance into the home, crafted to sing together in blissful harmony. The Beoplay M5 features an aluminium disc that answers to viscous-dampened movement to manage volume and connection controls. Three evenly-spaced tweeters, a front facing mid-range driver, and a powerful woofer projecting its power down towards a meticulously designed disperser, provide a uniform diffusion of the Bang & Olufsen Signature 360º Sound throughout the space. The beautiful green woven wool produced by Kvadrat, a renowned Danish textile manufacturer, was constructed to add warm texture and enhance acoustics. The BeoSound 1 is a portable wireless speaker system, flexible to follow you to any room in your home or outside—the freedom of choice. It bears a built-in proximity sensor that detects your presence by calculating your distance, applying instantly, and automatically turning towards you, ready at your command. Its elegant design resembles a musical instrument to harmonise, not only in functionality but also in aesthetics—to create the perfect soundscape wherever the beauty of music takes you.

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Partnership with Bang & Olufsen

Fern
Harmonies 1
Harmonies 3
Harmonies 2