Travel

NoMad New York

Located on the corner of 28th and Broadway, just north of Madison Square Park, The NoMad Hotel is an old Beaux-Arts building that has been revived to its original grandeur by French architect and interior designer, Jacques Garcia, best known for his contemporary interiors of Paris hotels and restaurants.

The design of the hotel was inspired by the classic, timeless style of the Parisian flat of Garcia's youth and blends classic grand hotels of Europe with a distinct New York sensibility. Each wall is adorned with hand-selected, richly textured custom-designed furnishings and original artwork. The lofty ceilings throughout the hotel provide luxurious spaces to enjoy dining, socialising, and rest. 

The hotel's elegant food and beverage menu was created by Chef Daniel Humm and Restaurateur Will Guidara. Inspired by Chef Humm's time spent throughout Switzerland, California, and New York City, the restaurant is rooted in the same traditions found at the critically acclaimed, Michelin three-star rated Eleven Madison Park. The menu is sophisticated, yet approachable, complemented by a wine program that celebrates the great wine-growing regions of the world and innovative, classically-focused cocktails.

The hotel's most coveted features are its signature claw-foot bathtubs, ARGAN soaps by La Bottega, city views, and a restaurant built in a sunlit glass-enclosed atrium. Other amenities include a nightly turndown service, a 24-hour gym and a bi-level library, plus an indoor/outdoor rooftop event space, and a stylish lounge with a 24-foot mahogany bar.

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thenomadhotel.com

NoMad Bed
NoMad Bath
Gucci Shoes
NoMad Books
NoMad Desk
NoMad Vines
NoMad Library
NoMad Dining

MINI x Shanghai

Automotive, Living, Work, Fashion. On first glance, these sectors may seem detached or isolated from one another, however, together they are the core elements that build the foundation of urban life for the Creative Class. MINI has introduced a unique vision for a brighter city life, whilst keeping a small footprint. The MINI mission is to integrate design expertise with the spirit of experience—a radically new future of urban living.

Cityscapes characterised by density and scarcity are reconstructing inner-city spatial aptitudes into a modernised currency in the era of hyper-urbanisation. Growing urban populations, space utilisation, and demographic amalgamation are evoking a collision between the supply and demand of living space in the global metropolises. Innovative architectural concepts that "think outside of the box", and integrate space and time, have become a necessity, as the most relevant urban potentials lay the framework for a future focused on personal flexibility, experience, and inspiration—together.

The MINI Shanghai URBAN MATTERS EXHIBITION took place from October 27 to November 7, 2017. The event was a paramount catalyst to the MINI mission to curate, create, and reinvent solutions—connecting the past to the future for a brighter urban life. 

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Partnership with MINI


MINI x NYC

MINI LIVING has designed the URBAN CABIN, a micro-house that acts as a research space for revolutionising urban living. The aim of the project is to create a pragmatic space inspired by local surroundings and bring light to relevant architectural solutions for urban needs and local identities, whilst keeping a small footprint upon Earth. The URBAN CABIN in Brooklyn camouflages into the landscape and illustrates New York for the vibrant city that it is—a blend of cultural influences from around the world.  

The URBAN CABIN façade flaunts iridescent acrylic glass in bright colours that change with every movement—a reflection of the bursts of inspiration and diversity in New York. In contrast, the back door—disguised as a hammock nestled in the a beautiful vertical garden—opens to the air for rest and restoration, a breath of calm and tranquility. The culture of the project meshes a spiked, humorous façade with a soft brightly coloured upholstered nestlike seat on its interior. “It’s basically St. Mark’s Place in the 80s: a bit punk, a bit kawaii...and close to John Hejduk,” states Peter Zuspan (principal of Bureau V), detailing some of the cabin's design references.

There will be a sequence of events and activities involving the URBAN CABIN through October and November 2017. 

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Partnership with MINI


Prospector Co.

As the heir of an aromatherapist, Kyle Hinton established Prospector Co. in Savannah, Georgia, in 2010. The unisex bath, body, and grooming commodities are constructed in care with sensitive skin in mind, formulated with no additives, artificial fragrances, and colouring. To ensure highest quality, each clean-scented elixir is blended in small portions with great attention to detail and encased by hand in classic apothecary-inspired bottles. I have been using Prospector Co. for quite a few years now and I truly recommend their products for the individual keen on natural, less commercialised goods. Health and wellness begins with the ingredients we ingest, including ones we allow our skin to absorb on a daily basis. Presented here are a few personal favourites. 


COMPRESSED TOWEL TABLETS

These compressed cotton fibre tablets instantly decompress at the touch of water and expand into small facial towelettes for convenient personal care anywhere, anytime. They are brilliant for travel and in-flight relaxation when paired with your favourite soak and a few drops of essential oils. For a lovely touch, these little jars make a welcoming and refreshing gift for guests who have paid you a weekend visit. 

LAVANDULA ANGUSTIFOLIA CREAM
8 oz. Push Dispenser

This calming moisturising hand and body cream, infused with botanicals, was designed with pure relaxation in mind. Creamy, yet light and absorbent, it leaves the skin feeling hydrated, smooth, and replenished. The essential oil blend of lavender, rosemary, and cedarwood amalgamate into a scent of subtle broken flowers, overgrown gardens, and springtime freshness. 

ROSEMARY SAGE HAND WASH
16 oz. Push Dispenser

This gentle cleansing soap is a soothing fusion of herbal essential oils with a revitalising, garden-fresh scent. Eucalyptus and sage open the sinuses and breathe clean air into the kitchen or bath. Rosemary intermixed with tea tree offer anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, and deodorising properties to the palms. Thyme, characteristic with its warm, spiced scent, bears additional disinfectant features as well.

SHAVING BRUSHES

Using only the highest quality materials and handcrafted detail, all of our brushes are manufactured in Germany, working with an 80-year-old, family-owned business. The superior performance and longevity gained from age-old techniques and modern engineering make for an heirloom-quality brush that “lifts” the shaving experience (Prospector Co.).

PURE BRISTLE SHAVING BRUSH 
Made in Germany

The Pure Bristle is a natural hair brush, a superb choice for wet shaving. Its anatomy includes a beechwood handle and economical boar hair, which gives a firmer, more rigid effect to the shave, that mellows beautifully with age. This makes for an exceptional entry brush for a new wet shaver. I have given this dapper brush as a gift to a comrade and he is quite pleased. 

ACACIA WOOD SHAVING BRUSH
Made in Germany, Vegan

The natural Acacia Wood brush, with its long-lasting durability and high resistance to water, is another excellent option. The bristle is made from a superior black fibre that exudes similar qualities of the badger hair. These fibres are long-lasting, tenacious, and produce a marvelous foaming lather—they prompt reliable softness even through the constant wet and dry periods of daily use. 

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Partnership with Prospector Co.


Water Journal 2º

I am truly humbled to share that my writing and photography have been published in Water Journal - Volume 2ºa quiet exploration of all things water, celebrating its undeniable beauty and complexity.

Published in London, it features beautiful, honest stories from incredibly talented and inspiring creatives around the world. It is a stunning work of art dedicated to the experience and cultural significance of water. I fell in utter love with the Journal since Volume 1º and there are no words that would do justice to encapsulate Water Journal.

From the ethereal images that send one on a journey afar to the graceful curation of intimate stories, heartfelt poetry, and elegant design, one must feel the publication in one's hands to truly grasp and appreciate the intricacy of Water Journal

I wrote a short memoir paired with my photography about my connection to water titled: Chasing Fog. It is an absolute honour to be a part of the publication. A massive thank you goes out to Edvinas Bruzas, Editor & Founder.  

Order Volume 2º on Water Journal

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waterjournal.co


Autumn Muses

As I peer through the rustic window back home in New York, I see leaves starting to change colour. The brisk zephyrs pass through trees with sombre sighs; the light is slowly growing melancholic and moody, signifying the beginning of my most favourite season—autumn. With ambient music playing in the background, I am sipping tea, deep in green with the essence of roasted rice, and musing upon my summer.

‘Elegance is not about being noticed, it’s about being remembered,’ articulates Giorgio Armani. And, the HP Spectre is an unforgettable one.

I never thought that I would fancy another laptop other than the one I owned for the past 4 years, but the Spectre provided me with a new perspective into my art, which allowed me to reinvent my creative vision.

This past summer, I aimed to nourish my adoration in travel to a foreign land far away from the metropolis as well as increase breadth in my travel work. Some were a bit surprised at my newest travel location, as it is the opposite from the hustle and bustle characteristic of the city that I gravitate towards. However, it is reminiscent of my work as a mere child, when my passions in photography blossomed, and I took special interest in capturing the beauty of a simple dandelion.

I typically do not bring my old laptop on travels because it is quite cumbersome, but the Spectre is so incredibly light, it was fitting to bring along with me everywhere I went. This laptop challenges the future of computers—the extreme thinness of the Spectre without the compromise of power is the feature that I found to be the most striking. As I admire the Spectre bathing in autumnal light on my windowsill, I can see just how unbelievably thin this laptop is.

Moreover, from the i7 Intel Core to the artisan craftsmanship with carbon fibre, aluminium, glass trackpad, and gorgeous keyboard—the attention to detail is stunning, making this gem elegant, yet solid.

Being an urban soul, as I have written in in my previous Journal entry, I predominantly captured the ephemeral, quiet moments in urban cities. But with my Spectre, I traversed the ocean to rural Iceland and my artistic expression has distinctly evolved, evident as my visual storytelling of my magical adventure slowly unravelled. My Spectre became the perfect summer companion and will continue to be in the future.

Escaping the city with my beloved Spectre was incredibly exhilarating—it was the highlight of my summer. My heart is full.

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Partnership with HP


Spectre in Iceland

Little 1.5m me and my 13cm platform boots hiked across a mysterious post-apocalyptic planet through endless kilometres of rocks and black sand, and stumbled upon a mysterious plane wreckage peeking through thick fog. I stood on top of a mountain amongst the clouds, breathless, revelling in its mystifying allure. I am finally herethe land of fire and ice, Iceland. 

Iceland is a magical place that I have dreamed of visiting ever since I was a child, thumbing through old issues of National Geographic. I diverged from my comfort and familiarity in urban cities and ventured to a more remote land that breathes magic and wonderment through the untouched beauty of naturemy most adventurous escapade yet. 

Admittedly, I have always been a city person. My upbringing is deeply rooted in Brooklyn and I am studying at Columbia University, which is adjacent to Harlem. I grew up living most of my life in New York City. But, spending more and more time with my Spectre, I was struck with a delightful spark of new inspiration, which led me to reinvent my creative catharsis. 

My creative work encompasses city lifefrom the forgotten ruins and remnants of old cities around the world contrasting with the architecture of the 21st century to food and still life moments present in urban settings. However, because the Spectre is extremely feather-light, versatile, and powerful with a long-lasting battery, it provided me with confidence to venture with it outside of Reykjavík, the capital and largest city in Iceland.

I felt that I was not bound to the city. My creativity deepened as I lost myself in more landscapesmountains, glaciers, and waterfalls, to places that I have never been to before. I even had the pleasure of seeing Aurora Borealis dance in person, the stunning Northern Lights. The Spectre allowed me edit in the mountains and visualise my work on screen on site, breathing in the crisp air, overlooking the water. 

I am becoming more obsessed with the Spectre since my previous Journal entry, as it is expanding my creativity into landscapes and nature. I am reinventing my obsession. 

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Partnership with HP


Up + Away

I will be jetting off very soon, up and away, on my most adventurous escapade yet. I will be flying to a magical place that I have dreamed of visiting ever since I was a child, thumbing through old issues of National Geographic. I will be deviating slightly from my comfort in urban cities and travelling to a more remote land that breathes magic and wonderment through the untouched beauty of nature. Follow along through my lens as I slowly whisper my story. 

As I wrote in a previous Journal entry, I travel super light and rarely bring checked luggage, so I was delighted to discover Away, a 'one size fits all' case that I could take anywhere in the world with ease. I gave my Away Carry-On a test run on a short trip to LA and I cannot recommend this Carry-On enough. It is the perfect travel companion and will be coming along on the journey with me.

The exterior is crafted from premium German polycarbonate and the interior features an original Away compression system, removable laundry bag, and a high capacity USB charger. Additionally, the 360° spinner wheels ensure a smooth ride. 


ONE SIZE FITS ALL
Designed to comply with major airlines regarding size regulations at 21.7" H x 13.7" W x 9" D (44.4 linear inches). Custom inset wheels offer 10% more packing space.

POWER TRIP
A removable interior 10,000 mAh battery and two USB ports let multiple devices charge at once. Wall adapter and luggage-charging cable are included. 

LOCK IT DOWN
Away built a TSA-approved combination lock into the top of the bag. The zippers slot right in, so items are safe. 

BUILT FOR LIFE
The hardshell exterior is made of 100% Bayer Makrolon polycarbonate, a material unrivaled in strength and impact resistance. It is so light, the entire bag weighs in at only 7.2 lbs.

STRONG FINISH
Topped off with luxurious touches with premium interior mesh, YKK zippers, 360° Hinomoto double-wheel spinners, and a leather luggage tag. 

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awaytravel.com


UK Highlights

“Travel makes one modest. You see what a tiny place you occupy in the world.” — Gustave Flaubert


Travel Favourites

With parents who speak contrasting languages and a family tree diverse in ethnicities, I was brought up open-minded, accepting of all cultures, and I have learned to embrace my multicultural heritage. From linguistics to cuisine to fashion to lifestyle habits—it is all incredibly fascinating to me. So, I am onto my next adventure—I am returning to the UK for study abroad to delve deeper into my British family history. Although this is not my first time travelling overseas, it is my first time studying abroad and I am excited to be exploring Manchester, Leeds, and more of London—to name a few cities.

I am a light packer as I value functionality and practicality, so I typically do not bring any luggage that needs to be checked. Most of the time, I bring a roomy carry-on duffel or capacious backpack and a camera bag (which bears ample pockets for toiletries) and utilise military-style packing. Anything else that may be found, provided, or easily purchased abroad if needed, I leave behind. Displayed here are some travel favourites.


Gypsy Water + Blanche Hand Cream: Byredo
Travel Kit: Aesop
Charcoal Bristle Bamboo Toothbrush: Ernest
Void Watch: Anekdote
Leather Gloves: Coach
Button-down: Korean Boutique in NYC
Flats: ASKA
Boots: UNIF
Bow Ties: Topman
Waterproof Clutch + Drypack: Vicious Venom


LA x Gallery

I reckon it has been a while since my last post, but if you are familiar with university, autumn and winter seasons are pretty involved, naturally dense with disquisitions, presentations, exams, and more specifically for me, conducting research at the laboratory—channelling my inner mad scientist. Nevertheless, even offline, I continue to compose and record floating thoughts on my old typewriter or in my leather-bound notebooks, and those who follow me on Instagram are well aware that nothing hinders me from documenting memories through the camera lens.

In November, I was deeply humbled to have my photography work displayed on my own wall in the Eye for an Eye exhibit, hosted by Hands Down, alongside the masterpieces of National Geographic, Time, Getty Images, and numerous other brilliant contributors from around the globe. It was incredible and inspiring. It was the first time I had my work framed 20x30” in a gallery and my first time in LA—as well as the West Coast of the United States. I have been to Alaska, but I suppose that is a different story. Nonetheless, LA was a convivial and invigorating experience.

Besides flying across the country for the exhibit, I took the chance to explore LA a bit. Presented here are a few favourite memories cherished with my better half. I shall return to experience more of the city in the future.


Griffith Observatory: a facility resting on the south-facing slope of Mount Hollywood Griffith Park. It showcases a spectacular a view of the Los Angeles Basin, including Downtown Los Angeles to the southeast, Hollywood to the south, and the Pacific Ocean to the southwest. The observatory contains a stellar view of the Hollywood sign, and an extensive array of space and science-related displays. Since the observatory opened in 1935, admission has been free, in accordance with Griffith's will.

Stahl House (Case Study House #22): a modernist-styled house designed by architect Pierre Koenig in the Hollywood Hills section of Los Angeles, California. Photographic and anecdotal evidence suggests that the architect's client, Buck Stahl, may have provided an inspiration for the overall structure. In 2013 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Built in 1959 as part of the Case Study Houses program, the house is considered an iconic representation of modern architecture in Los Angeles during the twentieth century. It was made famous by a Julius Shulman photograph displaying two women leisurely sitting in a corner of the house with an eventide panoramic view of the city through floor-to-ceiling glass walls. The house has been featured in numerous fashion shoots, films, and advertising campaigns.


The Gates Key West

We were greeted by blithe palm trees decorated with crystalline dew, encircled by the Gulf of Mexico in a tiny pocket of paradise, The Gates Key West Hotel. Its concept was inspired by the island's lush and diverse past, from Bahamian conchs to Cuban revolutionaries and literary legendaries. It is the rich, intricate history that makes Key West so special.

For an ephemeral moment, we escaped reality. 

It was a weekend getaway to unlock the keys and savor the last bit of warmth before returning to the imminent long and bitter winter season in New York. We were welcomed with a palette of creamy whites and neutral hues punctuated with color accents, eco-friendly and reclaimed details of exposed whitewashed beams and custom platform beds of hand-washed pine. The hotel amenities were designed for the discerning traveler, incorporating luxurious bedding, plush towels and bathrobes from Turkish Towel Company, and key lime bath essentials from Key West Aloe. Each room also displays original work by award-winning local photographer Jorge de la Torriente of Key West’s De La Gallery.

In the center of the hotel, rests a food truck called The Blind Pig and we must admit that we were a bit skeptical. However, the fish was grilled to an excellent medium, the soft-shell tacos were splendidly spiced, and the tortilla crisps and fresh guacamole were perfectly salted and slightly tart—a unique “Conch fusion” menu inspired by Key West’s Cuban, Bahamian, Caribbean, and Floridian roots. The fare smelled too delicious and instantly satisfied our palettes, it did not make it in any photos. We finished the trip with the perfect mojitos from The Rum Row—refreshing and sweet. The people were just so cordial and warm, I surely will return in the future.

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gateshotelkeywest.com


Wythe Hotel

Just walking into the room was a breath of fresh air. The Wythe Hotel is a haven which I frequently escape to for a staycation or short retreat and I am almost hesitant to share photos since it holds a special nook in my heart. It still remains one of my most treasured hotels and I have been waiting for the right moment to document it. From the outside, it may appear analogous to all of the old neighboring warehouses in Williamsburg with rustic brick walls and vintage industrial features, however, the inside is classic-modern, chic, and tastefully minimal with urban character. 

A former barrel and cask cooperage, circa 1901, the Wythe Hotel began with the uncovering of a factory on the Williamsburg, Brooklyn waterfront. It has now been refurbished into a 70-room hotel by trio Australian hotelier Peter Lawrence, local property developer Jed Walentas (of Two Trees) and celebrated restaurateur Andrew Tarlow (of Diner and Marlow & Sons).

With floor-to-ceiling windows that showcase glorious views of the Manhattan skyline and a standalone pedestal tub, the hotel is of ebullient industrial charm—the original bare bricks, arched windows, and impressive cast iron columns have all been artfully preserved, while the bucolic pine ceilings were reconditioned into bed frames.

The hotel’s rooftop bar, The Ides, rests in a new glass box extension above the old warehouse, while the restaurant, Reynard, serves a menu that changes nearly every day with seasonal fare, wood-fired dishes created by Tarlow, and the finest handmade desserts with gourmet flavours.

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wythehotel.com


Noguchi Museum

One of my cherished perks of being a Columbia University student is that admission to NYC museums and galleries is complimentary. I am quite partial to scoping out and venturing to underrated gems, so naturally, The Noguchi Museum was at the top of my must-see list of museums. I was bestowed a small fraction of personal time, so I took the occasion to completely immerse myself in zen and augment my knowledge in art (and celebrate another year on Earth). However, I am ecstatic to be returning to the laboratory, utterly enthralled, to conduct research at Columbia University Medical Center to continue on the odyssey and life goal to mitigate cancer. But for now, let us take a glimpse into Noguchi's art and legacy. 

The Noguchi Museum was created and designed by internationally and critically acclaimed, Japanese-American sculptor, Isamu Noguchi (1904–1988), for the installation of masterpieces he deemed to be characteristic archetypes of his life’s vision.

Opened in 1985, the Museum is housed in a reconstructed industrial building, connected to a building and interior garden of Noguchi’s design. Located in the vibrant neighborhood of Long Island City, Queens, the Museum is considered in itself to be one of the artist’s greatest works. In building a museum, Noguchi was an early pioneer who led the metamorphosis of the Long Island City area into the arts district it is today, home to cultural institutions such as Socrates Sculpture Park, SculptureCenter, MoMA PS1, and Museum of the Moving Image, among others (Noguchi Museum, 2015).

Noguchi constructed the Museum conglomerate as an open-air sculpture garden ensconced within architecture that encloses ten galleries. In its entirety, the Museum emanates a visceral, meditative amplitude in which to appreciate Noguchi's sculpture and design, accomplishing a central leitmotif that Noguchi considered indispensable to his life's cultivation. Visitors enter the two-level, estimating 27,000-square-foot, Museum through the distinguished sculpture garden. While the ground-level galleries and garden contain a perpetual display of Noguchi's work, elected from his own collection (circa 2004), the Museum routinely showcases transitory exhibitions that manifests a rich, contextualised view of Noguchi's work in the upper galleries.

An international focus point for the study and interpretation of Noguchi’s work, one can feel the dedication of the Museum to illuminating the artist’s vision, his wisdom with sculpture and public spaces, and the legacy of his work in later artists. However, just seeing the tranquil garden with Noguchi's sculptures, weeping cherry trees and bamboo, are worth the trip alone. His work is unmatched, enigmatic, and thought-provoking.

Upon entering, I was transported to a tranquil and harmonious haven that induced a feeling as if I was not in the city. The intimacy of Noguchi’s design of the Museum is an elemental and extraordinary part of the experience. It remains a place for the exploration of individual artistic endeavor and creative collaboration through exposure to Noguchi's eclectic practice. The relevance of underscoring the character of The Noguchi Museum, even as it grows in programming capacity and in public recognition, simply cannot be over-hyperbolised.


Paris in a New Light

I aimed to capture Paris in another light—to arouse another feeling, to conjure a peculiar emotion that wanders from the stereotypical whimsical photos of Paris—arcane, bold, yet wistful and still. When I traveled to France, it was mid-winter—there were no leaves or blooming flora—it was as if the city had shed its feathers into a deep slumber. I was lured to the shadows and dark elegiac light of mystérieux exposing the striking skeleton of Paris.

...your only responsibility as an artist is to get lost in and follow your obsessions as far as they go, because anything besides that is copying someone else or doing something that's not true to yourself. — Sam Beam

It is easy to go to the same location to emulate a photo that one may have seen. One may be inclined to photograph that particular place in an analogous fashion, or one may have predisposed thoughts that the way another captures a photo is the only perspective, the right approach. However, one would surely be mistaken; there are virtually endless angles and aspects—all brilliant and sui generis. Make the photo your own, your art, your voice. Create from within.


Mütter Museum

My trip to The Mütter Museum of The College of Physicians Of Philadelphia is undeniably a highlight this semester. Being that I am a future physician, this place made my heart sing and tops my list of favourite anatomical museums. Mütter houses a phenomenal collection of 139 skulls showing anatomic variation among ethnic groups in central and eastern Europe, bizarre medical oddities, and an extensive library of pathological specimens. The moment I stepped onto the burgundy carpet, my heart fluttered with utter excitement and my eyes opened wide like a curious child.

I was not able to photograph too much since security was high and I did not dare to expose my bulky camera, however, I am quite content with my sneaky iPhone photos. The second to last photo features the stunning world-famous cast and livers of the original "Siamese" twins, Chang and Eng Bunker. These conjoined twins were born and amazingly survived in what is now Thailand in 1811. They came to the United States in 1829 as touring performers and speakers. Eventually, they retired, married sisters, and bought adjacent farms in North Carolina in the early 1840s. How fascinating! The legacy of the Bunkers is a topic of contemplation and is an ongoing medical interest regarding pathways leading to fetal abnormalities. The last photo showcases the full embryonic development of bone (left) and the impressive skeleton of a 7-foot, 6-inch giant from Kentucky (right).

Before heading home to New York, I took some time to wander through the streets of Philadelphia and stopped by The Philadelphia Science Festival, a delicious lineup of food trucks, and a charming coffee shop for a refreshing cold Japanese brew.


London +

I realise it has been a while since my last blog post. I went on an eventful, yet rewarding hiatus for a few weeks after my solo trip abroad due to university, lab research, photo shoots, and work at the hospital. As one who lives every aspect of life wholeheartedly, I was saving my next entry for a time when I was not consumed with exams on respiratory acidosis, buried in a 30-page research paper on quantum mechanics, extracting DNA, streak plating thousands of unicellular flagellates, and taking care of sundowning patients who curiously become cantankerous while telling bizarre stories of the 6th dimension and pocketbooks and batting everything in sight—all simultaneously—so that I could devote my full attention to writing. Needless to say, every day at the hospital has been truly exhilarating and my patients have shown me invaluable wisdom that has opened my eyes to a new world.

While many are attracted to the equator for the salvation of warmth, I find myself gravitating toward the poles of the Earth. A few weeks ago, I began my Spring Holiday trip in London visiting family and continued to Paris and Oslo. London is one of my favourite cities I have traveled to thus far and dare I say, I adore London more than Paris. London is trim, polished, and the brisk, chilly climate is one that I fancy—the city just suits my personality. Paris is lovely, however, I feel that Paris is unduly romanticised and that the allure and crisp elegance of London is quite often underrated.

My days began at 3am. As I stepped out the door, my lungs would fill with wintry zephyr. It felt energising and restorative. The beautiful fog loomed over the city—the stillness and lull was spellbinding. I rode the Tube to explore iconic sites like the London Eye, Big Ben, Parliament Square, Buckingham Palace, London Bridge, and a few art galleries. I also gave Dippy the Diplodocus a visit at the Natural History Museum. I was warned by previous UK visitors that the food was mediocre in its essence, however, I had a different experience and delighted in the cuisine of the restaurants and cafés. My favourite was at a dapper Japanese-inspired coffee shop where I took great pleasure in a shrimp katsu sandwich, iced coffee, and matcha strawberry cake for dessert while reading the latest Monocle. As I sit here, typing and retyping descriptions to my photographs, I realise that there are no words good enough, expressive enough, just enough, and that they must be left wordless, unadulterated, and left to the imagination. 

It is invigorating to travel solo. You realise how small you are and you just feel so free. Limitless.


Spring Travels

It's Spring Holiday—I am quite excited since I am visiting family and this is the first time I am setting foot in Europe solo. Pictured above are a few essentials that always journey with me: Leather back writer to hold my passport and small notebook, Aēsop hand balm, ASKA Collection Loyd flats (favourite flats thus far), Maison Kitsuné Paris print button down shirt, Top Man bow tie from my good friend Jane, Larsson & Jennings watch, Nikomat film camera, and of course Kinfolk Magazine, my favourite read for the plane ride.