Mütter Museum


My trip to The Mütter Museum of The College of Physicians Of Philadelphia is undeniably a highlight this semester. Being that I am a future physician, this place made my heart sing and tops my list of favourite anatomical museums. Mütter houses a phenomenal collection of 139 skulls showing anatomic variation among ethnic groups in central and eastern Europe, bizarre medical oddities, and an extensive library of pathological specimens. The moment I stepped onto the burgundy carpet, my heart fluttered with utter excitement and my eyes opened wide like a curious child.

I was not able to photograph too much since security was high and I did not dare to expose my bulky camera, however, I am quite content with my sneaky iPhone photos. The second to last photo features the stunning world-famous cast and livers of the original "Siamese" twins, Chang and Eng Bunker. These conjoined twins were born and amazingly survived in what is now Thailand in 1811. They came to the United States in 1829 as touring performers and speakers. Eventually, they retired, married sisters, and bought adjacent farms in North Carolina in the early 1840s. How fascinating! The legacy of the Bunkers is a topic of contemplation and is an ongoing medical interest regarding pathways leading to fetal abnormalities. The last photo showcases the full embryonic development of bone (left) and the impressive skeleton of a 7-foot, 6-inch giant from Kentucky (right).

Before heading home to New York, I took some time to wander through the streets of Philadelphia and stopped by The Philadelphia Science Festival, a delicious lineup of food trucks, and a charming coffee shop for a refreshing cold Japanese brew.