LA x Gallery

I reckon it has been a while since my last post, but if you are familiar with university, autumn and winter seasons are pretty involved, naturally dense with disquisitions, presentations, exams, and more specifically for me, conducting research at the laboratory—channelling my inner mad scientist. Nevertheless, even offline, I continue to compose and record floating thoughts on my old typewriter or in my leather-bound notebooks, and those who follow me on Instagram are well aware that nothing hinders me from documenting memories through the camera lens.

In November, I was deeply humbled to have my photography work displayed on my own wall in the Eye for an Eye exhibit, hosted by Hands Down, alongside the masterpieces of National Geographic, Time, Getty Images, and numerous other brilliant contributors from around the globe. It was incredible and inspiring. It was the first time I had my work framed 20x30” in a gallery and my first time in LA—as well as the West Coast of the United States. I have been to Alaska, but I suppose that is a different story. Nonetheless, LA was a convivial and invigorating experience.

Besides flying across the country for the exhibit, I took the chance to explore LA a bit. Presented here are a few favourite memories cherished with my better half. I shall return to experience more of the city in the future.


Griffith Observatory: a facility resting on the south-facing slope of Mount Hollywood Griffith Park. It showcases a spectacular a view of the Los Angeles Basin, including Downtown Los Angeles to the southeast, Hollywood to the south, and the Pacific Ocean to the southwest. The observatory contains a stellar view of the Hollywood sign, and an extensive array of space and science-related displays. Since the observatory opened in 1935, admission has been free, in accordance with Griffith's will.

Stahl House (Case Study House #22): a modernist-styled house designed by architect Pierre Koenig in the Hollywood Hills section of Los Angeles, California. Photographic and anecdotal evidence suggests that the architect's client, Buck Stahl, may have provided an inspiration for the overall structure. In 2013 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Built in 1959 as part of the Case Study Houses program, the house is considered an iconic representation of modern architecture in Los Angeles during the twentieth century. It was made famous by a Julius Shulman photograph displaying two women leisurely sitting in a corner of the house with an eventide panoramic view of the city through floor-to-ceiling glass walls. The house has been featured in numerous fashion shoots, films, and advertising campaigns.